Jazz Baby

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Blurb:

While all of Mississippi bakes in the scorching summer of 1925, sudden orphanhood wraps its icy embrace around pretty Emily Ann “Baby” Teegarten, a young teen.

Taken in by an aunt bent on ridding herself of this unexpected burden, Baby Teegarten plots her escape using the only means at her disposal: a voice that brings church ladies to righteous tears, and makes both angels and devils take notice. “I’m going to New York City to sing jazz,” she brags to anybody who’ll listen. But the Big Apple—well, it’s an awful long way from that dry patch of earth she’d always called home.

So when the smoky stages of New Orleans speakeasies give a whistle, offering all sorts of shortcuts, Emily Ann soon learns it’s the whorehouses and opium dens that can sidetrack a girl and dim a spotlight…and knowing the wrong people can snuff it out.

Jazz Baby just wants to sing—not fight to stay alive.

My Take:

Okay. So I’ll admit to being a bit of a book snob. I rarely ever give non-traditionally published books a chance. Then along comes Jazz Baby, a stunningly beautiful indie novel, and the rules are out the window. This book is solely responsible for my new and growing affection toward independently published novels.

The story is set in 1925 Mississippi—with forays into New Orleans—where Emily “Baby” Teegarten, our young teenage protagonist, seeks her fame and fortune singing jazz upon the stages of various speakeasies scattered throughout that part of the deep south. But New York is her ultimate destination. New York is where people go to become stars. The problem is, our girl is poor, orphaned, and naive to all those nefarious characters lining up with their own agendas for Baby.

There are some dark moments in this story—a rape, a couple of murders, and drug use—but there are also some very touching moments. Our girl is young, pretty, talented, bisexual, and curious about all those appetites in life she feels she’s been kept away from for too long. There are sex scenes—though they are not gratuitous.

To claim the characters here are vividly real is a major understatement. This writer really took his time in developing even the minor players. I’ve read this one three times already—at just 224 pages, it can be finished in a day or two. I’ve also returned to various scenes numerous times just to feel those delicious words against my tongue once again. I highly recommend this one to those who enjoy great storytellers. How this novel isn’t a worldwide best seller is mind boggling.

Grab a copy of Jazz Baby

 

 

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