Strange Hwy: Short Stories

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Blurb:

If you ever find yourself on the Strange Hwy—don’t turn around. Don’t panic. Just. Keep. Going. You never know what you’ll find.
You’ll see magic at the fingertips of an autistic young man,
•A teen girl’s afternoon, lifetime of loss.
•A winged man, an angel? Demon—?
•Mother’s recognition, peace to daughter.
•Danny’s death, stifled secrets.
•Black man’s music, guitar transforms boy.
•Dead brother, open confession.
•First love, supernatural?—family becomes whole!
You can exit the Strange Hwy, and come back any time you want.
See, now you know the way in, don’t be a stranger.

My Take:

I am a super fan of this author. Beem Weeks just has a magical way of telling a story. Strange Hwy: Short Stories is another brilliant collection. Each story captures characters engaged in the simple act of living life. But these stories do not go where you believe they are heading. There is a twist at the end of most of these tales.

I am still amazed that this wonderful writer is not yet a household name among those who love to read well-told stories. Weeks covers multiple genres, offering a little something for all tastes. His characters are vivid and breathing and living. They will remain with you long after you set the book down.

This collection, much like his Slivers of Life collection, is a quick read. If you have ten minutes to kill, there’s a story in this book that will help you do just that. I finished the entire book in a few hours.

I’m still waiting on the Jazz Baby movie. And there are several of his short stories that would play beautifully on the silver screen. Come on, Hollywood. Enough with the sequels and the reboots. Here is a master storyteller just waiting to be discovered.

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Exposure

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Blurb:

Ann Rogers appears to be a happily married, successful young woman. A talented photographer, she creates happy memories for others, videotaping weddings, splicing together scenes of smiling faces, editing out awkward moments. But she cannot edit her own memories so easily–images of a childhood spent as her father’s model and muse, the subject of his celebrated series of controversial photographs. To cope, Ann slips into a secret life of shame and vice. But when the Museum of Modern Art announces a retrospective of her father’s shocking portraits, Ann finds herself teetering on the edge of self-destruction, desperately trying to escape the psychological maelstrom that threatens to consume her.

My Take:

This story follows Ann Rogers from childhood to dysfunctional adulthood and what might have been a promising career following in her late father’s footsteps as a known photographer.

Ann began her introduction into the photographic arts as her father’s young model, posing in various states of undress that stirred controversy while garnering her father with notoriety in the art world.

However, there are secrets that creep into her adult life that lead her to drugs, kleptomania, and other disastrous choices. The ending left me a little disappointed, but this is an intriguing story.

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I Know This Much Is True

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Blurb:

On the afternoon of October 12, 1990, my twin brother, Thomas, entered the Three Rivers, Connecticut, public library, retreated to one of the rear study carrels, and prayed to God the sacrifice he was about to commit would be deemed acceptable. . . .

One of the most acclaimed novels of our time, Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True is a story of alienation and connection, devastation and renewal, at once joyous, heartbreaking, poignant, mystical, and powerfully, profoundly human.

My Take:

Wally Lamb is a great American author telling amazing stories. I’ve been privileged to read a few of his works over the years. This one caught my attention because of the Oprah’s Book Club label. While I’m not a big fan of her former program, Oprah Winfrey sure can pick winners when it comes to books. I Know This Much Is True is one of a dozen or so I’ve read with the OBC designation attached. I’ve not been disappointed.

With this tale, Lamb takes on mental illness and twin brothers. His carefully constructed story is tight, deep, and fully developed. This story touches on alienation, religion, family, and reproduction. At 900+ pages, this book is long. But take my word, the journey is worth the time. I recommend pretty much anything from this author.

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